Friday, February 12, 2010

Miscellany

Typing that head reminded me of a book I received from a British family friend when I was about eight -- its title was Miscellany IV, and as an avid young reader I remember being dazzled by the array of short stories, poems, illustrations, puzzles, and whatnot between its covers. But I don't think I figured out what "miscellany" was until several years later. As far as I knew at the time, it was just a title, akin to naming the book Jabberwocky. It only occurred to me that the word might actually have a bona fide definition when I saw the word "miscellaneous" spelled out, and made the connection.

Anyway, you see the tack my brain is taking today -- like Stephen Leacock's Lord Ronald, it has leapt onto its horse and is riding madly off in all directions.

My original plan was to tell you about a couple of exciting new sock patterns I found on Knitty -- Pyroclastic (another word I'll have to look up, I suppose) and one of this season's surprise patterns, Skew (which happens to also be the name of a particularly flattering shade of lipstick that MAC discontinued, to my never-ending dismay and resentment).

(You see what I'm saying about the discombobulated brain thing, right?)

As soon as I saw Pyroclastic a couple of months ago, I began to think about doing it in this yarn, which Rachel forced me to buy on a long-ago trip to Lettuce Knit:

<--Lorna's Laces Shepherd Sock in Bittersweet


And while I don't have a yarn lined up for Skew, it intrigues me. How does the designer make the stripes do that wonky wavy thing around the heel? And socks knit on the bias? Fascinating. Must investigate.

Oh, and one more thing, while I'm in Seriously Scatterbrained Mode: some of you might recall my various rants on the topic of yarn bombing. Here's a blog post on the topic by the always erudite Leslie: Yarn Bombing

p.s. Pyroclastic flow, aka pyroclastic density current: a common and devastating result of volcanic eruptions. The flows of molten rock and gases can stream out of the erupting volcano at speeds of up to 700 kph (can't remember what that is in mph, but it's faster than you or I could run).

There you have it. And that, I promise you, is all for today.

Over and out.

No comments: